As states are moving toward comprehensive sexual health education, educators require engaging and effective curricula. This pre-post study (N=64) examined the feasibility of a comprehensive, media literacy education program for influencing adolescents’ sexual health and media literacy outcomes. After the program, participants were more likely to have the intention to use condoms during sex and talk to partners, parents, or medical professionals prior to sex. Media literacy outcomes included decreased perceived realism of and increased skepticism of media messages and improved media deconstruction skills. Overall, the results suggest that media literacy has the potential for positively influencing sexual health decisions.

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