Date of Award

2014

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Kathy Peno

Abstract

The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the learning and development process of three new teachers who were paired with mentors in a formal induction program in an urban district. The qualitative case study focused on three teacher-mentor dyads who were interviewed about their experience during the teachers’ first year of teaching in middle and high school of the district. In addition to interviews with teachers and their mentors, the researcher examined documents that were part of the mentoring process such as teacher reflective journals or mentor feedback forms. Using the Purposeful, Ongoing Mentoring Model (Peno & Silva Mangiante, 2012), teachers were asked to identify their beginning skill level, their level after one year with a Mentor, as well as their level during their second year of teaching without the help of a mentor. The process that led to their development was explored with the teachers and the Mentors. The results were centered around themes that emerged across cases as well as in vignettes of teacher-mentor practice as the dyads navigated problems or issues that arose in classroom management and instructional practice. Specifically, the results explored supports and challenges that the new teachers experienced during the mentoring process. Teachers reported that they felt their levels on the POMM were different depending on their comfort level with the skill. The results of the study indicate that mentoring new teachers is important to their skill development as established by the teachers and mentors report of development on the Novice to Expert skill model. The findings will be relevant to teacher educators, teachers, mentors, and school administrators as they struggle with the changing educational landscape and ways to most effectively prepare teachers.

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