Title

Neuroimaging and ADHD: FMRI, PET, DTI findings, and methodological limitations

Document Type

Article

Date of Original Version

5-1-2013

Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by pervasive and developmentally inappropriate levels of inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. There is no conclusive cause of ADHD although a number of etiologic theories have been advanced. Research across neuroanatomical, neurochemical, and genetic disciplines collectively support a physiological basis for ADHD and, within the past decade, the number of neuroimaging studies concerning ADHD has increased exponentially. The current selective review summarizes research findings concerning ADHD using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Although these technologies and studies offer promise in helping to better understand the physiologic underpinnings of ADHD, they are not without methodological problems, including inadequate sensitivity and specificity for psychiatric disorders. Consequently, neuroimaging technology, in its current state of development, should not be used to inform clinical practice. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Publication Title

Developmental Neuropsychology

Volume

38

Issue

4

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