Title

Does acculturation matter?: Food insecurity and child problem behavior among low-income, working hispanic households

Document Type

Article

Date of Original Version

5-1-2011

Abstract

Recent literature has noted that in some cases, less acculturation may be protective against adverse outcomes. This study sought to clarify the relationships between acculturation, food insecurity, and child outcomes. A sample of 339 low-income participants, comprised of non-Hispanic Whites (n = 171), English-speaking Hispanics (n = 89), and Spanish-speaking Hispanics (n = 79) were surveyed on food security and parental reports of child behavior problems. Results showed that Spanish-speaking Hispanics were at a social and economic disadvantage in comparison to non-Hispanic Whites and to English-speaking Hispanics. Spanish-speaking Hispanics reported significantly more concern and the least satisfaction with their children's physical health and had the highest rates of food insecurity. In contrast, on parental reports of child behavior, non-Hispanic Whites were significantly more likely to report problem behavior than either Hispanic group. Overall, the findings do not support the protective role of lower acculturation for Hispanic households. Implications of these findings in light of current research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2011.

Publication Title

Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences

Volume

33

Issue

2

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