Title

Racial/ethnic and weight status disparities in dieting and disordered weight control behaviors among early adolescents

Document Type

Article

Date of Original Version

8-1-2017

Abstract

Background This study examined whether racial/ethnic minority early adolescents with overweight/obesity are at increased risk of disordered weight control behaviors, defined as unhealthy behaviors aiming to control or modify shape and weight, ranging from self-induced vomiting to the use of dietary supplements. Methods U.S. Middle school children (n = 12.511) provided self-report of gender, race/ethnicity, height, and weight as well as dieting and disordered weight control behaviors. Results In the entire sample, 25.6% (n = 1514) of girls and 16.6% (n = 1098) of boys reported dieting within the last month, while 3.5% (n = 200) of girls and 2.7% (n = 176) of boys reported DWCB. Within all racial/ethnic groups, participants classified as being overweight/obese (34% to 50%) were more likely to report dieting compared to their counterparts without overweight/obesity (9.6% to 29.6%). Racial/ethnic minority children with overweight/obesity had an increased risk of dieting and disordered weight control behaviors compared to their counterparts without overweight/obesity, and, for some outcomes, compared to their White peers with overweight/obesity. Conclusions Racial/ethnic minority early adolescents with overweight/obesity are a particularly vulnerable group for disordered eating.

Publication Title

Eating Behaviors

Volume

26

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