Title

Psychopathology and HIV diagnosis among older adults in the United States: disparities by age, sex, and race/ethnicity

Document Type

Article

Date of Original Version

10-2-2020

Abstract

In 2016, 17% of new HIV infections in the US were among adults aged 50 and older. Differences by age, sex, and race/ethnicity exist among older people living with HIV. Co-morbid mental health and substance use disorders (SUD) are also major challenges for this population. This study examined the association between generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), SUD, depression, and HIV diagnosis among adults aged 50 and older, and the disparities by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Data were obtained from Cerner Corporation’s Health Facts® database. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine the associations between GAD, PTSD, SUD, and depression, and HIV diagnosis. Results were also stratified by age group, sex, and race/ethnicity. Overall, there were positive associations between SUD, depression, GAD, PTSD and HIV; and differences by age, sex and race/ethnicity existed in these associations. For example, after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity and marital status, men who were diagnosed with GAD were 10 times more likely (adjusted OR: 10.3; 95% CI: 8.75–12.1) to have an HIV diagnosis compared to men who were not diagnosed with GAD. Women who were diagnosed with GAD were five times more likely (adjusted OR: 5.01; 95% CI: 3.81–6.58) to have an HIV diagnosis compared to women who were not diagnosed with GAD. HIV prevention and intervention programs for older adults should address GAD, PTSD, SUD and depression and consider the age, sex and racial/ethnic disparities in the association between psychopathology and HIV.

Publication Title

Aging and Mental Health

Volume

24

Issue

10

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