Title

An exploratory study of substance use and misuse among college students with and without ADHD and other disabilities

Document Type

Article

Date of Original Version

11-1-2010

Abstract

Objective: The present study investigated potential differences between college students with and without disabilities (including ADHD, Asperger's syndrome, executive functioning disorder, and learning, mental health, vision, hearing, and physical/chronic disabilities) regarding self-reported substance use and misuse, perceived stress, and sensation seeking. Method: Students responded to a Stimulant Survey Questionnaire (SSQ), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Sensation-Seeking Scale (SSS), and items from the National College Health Assessment (NCHA). Results: The hypotheses were part supported as MANOVA results revealed that students with disabilities provided significantly lower ratings on the SSS and also reported lower alcohol and marijuana use. Students with ADHD were more likely to use or misuse prescription stimulant medication but were less likely to use alcohol than did students without ADHD. Conclusion: Students with disabilities compared to those without disabilities differed on levels of sensation seeking and alcohol and marijuana use. © 2010 SAGE Publications.

Publication Title

Journal of Attention Disorders

Volume

14

Issue

3

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