Title

Computer-mediated intervention tailored on transtheoretical model stages and processes of change increases fruit and vegetable consumption among urban African-American adolescents

Document Type

Article

Date of Original Version

1-1-2008

Abstract

Purpose. To examine the efficacy of an intervention based on the transtheoretical model (TTM) for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among economically disadvantaged African-American adolescents. Design. Pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study. Setting. Youth services agencies located in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Agencies were assigned to computer intervention (CIN) and nonintervention control study arms. Subjects. A total of 507 African-American adolescents ages 11 to 14 years. Intervention. Youths in the CIN arm completed four 30-minute intervention sessions tailored on TTM stages and processes of change. Measures. Self-reported fruit and vegetable consumption and stages, pros, cons, and self-efficacy for consumption. Analysis. Intervention effects were examined with analysis of covariance models that were controlled for demographic variables and baseline measures of each outcome. Chi-square analyses were used to examine between-arm differences in youths' stage progressions. Results. After adjustment by covariates, pros (p < .025) and fruit and vegetable consumption (p < .001) varied significantly with study arm. Youths in the CIN arm had higher pro scores and fruit and vegetable consumption than controls. More youths in the CIN arm than in the control arm progressed to later stages and maintained recommended intake levels (p < .05). Conclusions. A TTM-based intervention can increase fruit and vegetable intake and effect positive changes in TTM variables related to intake among economically disadvantaged African-American adolescents. Copyright © 2008 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

Publication Title

American Journal of Health Promotion

Volume

22

Issue

5

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