Title

Influence on fiber inclination and interfacial conditions on fracture in composite materials

Document Type

Article

Date of Original Version

6-1-1994

Abstract

Dynamic photoelasticity has been used to study the effect of the fiber-matrix interface and fiber orientation on dynamic crack growth in fiber composites. Two types of fiber-matrix interfaces are considered: well bonded and partly debonded. The fiber-matrix interface is characterized by conducting fiber pullout tests. Partly debonded fibers aligned with the loading direction, result in higher fiber debonded lengths, lower dynamic stress-intensity factor KID and lower fracture surface roughness compared to well bonded fibers. Orientation of brittle fibers, with respect to the loading direction, impairs their ability to lower KID, while oriented ductile fibers produce no significant change in KID. Misalignment of fibers from the loading direction reduces the fiber debonded length due to kinding of the fiber at the crack face. © 1994 Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc.

Publication Title

Experimental Mechanics

Volume

34

Issue

2

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