Use of Hyphenated Mass Spectrometry to Uncover True NAFLD Effect on Human Drug Disposition Proteins

Benjamin Joseph Barlock, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a chronic liver condition that is increasing in prevalence around the world, can range from reversible simple steatosis to irreversible and life-threatening cirrhosis and liver cancer. Along with lifestyle management, patients with NAFLD are generally prescribed numerous medications to treat their metabolic syndrome. These drugs must be cleared from the body and the liver, the main site for drug metabolism, contains drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters that facilitate the elimination of many compounds and their ultimate removal from the body. Any change to these proteins can result in altered exposure to systemic circulation and effects on a target. Considering the human liver tissues that are used in research come from donors who were hospitalized prior to death, it is also important to determine if they were receiving medications that may induce or inhibit drug metabolism. Alterations to these important proteins can cause changes to a person’s pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile but it is also imperative to make sure these changes are not a result of an exogenous compound rather than NAFLD itself.

Subject Area

Pharmaceutical sciences

Recommended Citation

Benjamin Joseph Barlock, "Use of Hyphenated Mass Spectrometry to Uncover True NAFLD Effect on Human Drug Disposition Proteins" (2019). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI27548769.
https://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI27548769

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