The Impact of Body Composition on Physical Function Performance in Middle-aged Women

Ashley Meyer, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

Research in older adults suggests that percent body fat may be strongly associated with physical function performance, causing increased risk for disability and loss of independence; however, the component of body composition that is most strongly associated with physical function in middle-aged females is incompletely characterized. This cross-sectional study examined the impact of lean mass and percent fat on physical function performance in middle-aged females. Eighty females (ages 52.58 ± 6.10 years) were assessed for body composition (lean mass, percent fat) via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, physical activity, and sedentary time via Accelerometer (steps per day, minutes per day), and physical function via Timed Up-And-Go, 30-Second Chair Stand, Transfer Task, Six-Minute Walk and Lift and Carry. Lean mass (total mass, lean mass index) was not related to any measure of physical function (all p > 0.05), while percent fat was significantly related to Transfer Task, 30-Second Chair Stand, and Six-Minute Walk performance (all p ≤ 0.05). Hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed: (1) age, steps per day, and percent fat were related to Transfer Task, 30-Second Chair Stand, and Six-Minute Walk performance (all p ≤ 0.05); (2) age, sedentary minutes per day, and percent fat were related to Timed Up-And-Go; (3) age, and average steps per day, but not percent fat, were associated with Lift and Carry performance (p > 0.05). In middle-aged women, percent fat was most strongly associated with physical function performance, suggesting that modifying percent fat via intervention may be a method for improving functional performance in middle-aged women.^

Subject Area

Kinesiology

Recommended Citation

Ashley Meyer, "The Impact of Body Composition on Physical Function Performance in Middle-aged Women" (2018). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI10788935.
https://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI10788935

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