Date of Award

1977

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Pharmaceutical Sciences

First Advisor

Norman A. Campbell

Abstract

As the Nigerian economy continues to grow, more multi-national pharmaceutical companies are being attracted to this market. However, new companies as well as those presently operating in Nigeria, are faced with a fundamental problem typical for companies doing business in developing countries. This problem is lack of information important in decision making.

There is a general lack of information and understanding of Nigeria's pharmaceutical legislations. Consequently, companies are forced to make many important decisions on the basis of lack of, or at best, incomplete information. In addition, little is presently known about industrial pharmaceutical practices in Nigeria.

The methodology consisted of two parts. First, the study analyzed major sections of Nigeria's pharmaceutical laws and compared them to United States drug legislations. Major differences were identified and explained.

The second part of the study consisted of gathering primary data from major United States and European pharmaceutical companies doing business in Nigeria. Responses obtained were compared to facts secure from the literature search.

Although the research was exploratory in nature rather than conclusive, the following conditions appear to exist:

1. There is a general lack of understanding of the Nigerian Food and Drug laws.

2. The laws themselves appear to be confusing with numerous loopholes.

3. The Nigerian legal environment is less stringent than in the United States.

4. Specifically, drug introduction legislation was found to be much less stringent in Nigeria than in the United States.

5. Drug Registration is not of major concern to pharmaceutical companies in Nigeria.

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