Date of Award

2015

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Psychology

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

James O. Prochaska

Abstract

Dropout from both smoking treatment and research study participation is often problematic and can negatively affect treatment and research outcomes respectively. The current study examined baseline predictors of both treatment and research phase completion in a combined dataset of 3 parallel, population-based studies targeting multiple health behaviors. Baseline variables were examined for associations with treatment and research completion (defined as completing the final time points respectively). Results from the multivariate model for the treatment phase (1-year from baseline) indicated that those who were divorced were 36% less likely to complete than non-divorced (OR = .64, 95% CI = .49, .84, p< .01). The treatment group was 35% less likely to complete compared to the control group (OR = .65, 95% CI = .54 - .79, p< .0001) and the patient sample was 1.3 times more likely to complete than non-patients (OR = 1.30, 95 % CI = 1.04 - 1.63, p< .05). Each year of education was associated with a 9% increase in the chance of completion (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.05, .1.15, p< .0001). Results from the multivariate model for the research phase (2-years from baseline) varied slightly from the treatment phase analysis. Similar to treatment, those divorced were 35% less likely to complete than non-divorced (OR = .65, 95% CI = .50, .84, p< .01), the treatment group was 38% less likely to complete than the controls (OR = .62, 95% CI = .51, .74, p< .0001), and each year of education was associated with a 9% increase in the chance of completion (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.14, p< .0001). Differing from the treatment phase, being in the patient sample was not significant, but those in the in the worksite sample were 26% less likely to complete (OR = .74, 95% CI = .56, .98, p< .05). Additionally, Hispanics were 52% less likely to complete the research phase compared to non-Hispanics (OR = .48, 95% CI = .23, .98, p< .05) and each 24-hour quit attempt was associated with a 4% decrease in the chance of completion (OR = .96, 95% CI = .93, .99, p< .05). These findings could inform future investigations in this area, a line of research that may be of high interest for the development of recruitment and retention methods.

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