Date of Award

1995

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Department

Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

First Advisor

P. Deurwrsa

Abstract

When considering the design of a new product, the aspect of serviceability and reliability are becoming major concerns for the product manufacturer. Moreover, when consumers consider purchasing a new product they are no longer just concerned with the initial purchase cost; they are becoming increasingly concerned with the "total" cost of ownership, part of which is the cost of service.

Although many of the operations found in service tasks resemble those encountered during initial assembly operations, there are many distinct differences. By utilizing design for assembly techniques the simplification of product assembly is assured but it does not guarantee that the product can be easily disassembled and serviced. In fact some of the "ideal" DFA conditions may negatively impact on the ease of serviceability of the product.

Previous research conducted in Design for Service, in the department of lndustrial and Manufacturing Engineering, has led to the development of time databases for specific operations, yet the research has not dealt with several other key issues, like the effect of operator position on the service time. The present research project has focused on determining how a product will be serviced and on determining which service procedures should be examined for improvements in efficiency. The importance procedure developed, will allow the design team to focus efforts to improve the service tasks which have been identified as important based on their failure rate and consequence of failure.

Share

COinS