Date of Award

1991

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Community Planning (MCP)

Department

Community Planning and Area Development

First Advisor

John J. Kupa

Abstract

A concern for groundwater quality and its supply is universal in communities where it is either their sole or ancillary potable water supply. Bermuda is no exception, but, like many island communities, it must devise strategies to continue its status quo of self-sufficiency in regards to its water supply, although this has not always been the case. Bermuda is one of the most attractive tourist resorts islands in the Atlantic Ocean, (although it is not classified among the Caribbean Islands) therefore extreme effort is made for it to remain competitive in the tourist market. While such attempt have proven to be economically advantageous the society, the trade-offs are manifested in the Island's natural resources, being, either deteriorated or gradually depleted. Certainly, the tourist industry cannot solely be blamed for Bermuda's environmental decline, since other factors must be considered, such as the total annual population, but to a greater degree, the impact of legislation on the physical landscape and (as is the crux of this thesis) on the groundwater. The old adage "An ounce of prevention ... " has been herald by environmentalist ab initio, and this is indicative of the Bermuda case where, in the past, authorities were less concerned with the consequences of land development on it groundwater supply. This does not hold true for today since groundwater quality has becomes an issue. The aim of this research project is to provide a comprehensive planning approach to the relationship of land development and groundwater quality.

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