Date of Award

1981

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Community Planning

First Advisor

John J. Kupa

Abstract

This handbook is an operating manual that outlines the powers, duties and responsibilities of the planning board as set forth in New Hampshire's Planning and Zoning Legislation. It is designed to be a handy reference for planning boards, and may also be of educational and practical value to Town and City Administrators; elected officials; other community Boards and Commissions; and to the layman citizen who has an interest in participating in the community planning process.

The population of New Hampshire grew by 20. 2% during the 1970-1980 decade. It is expected to grow another 28% by 1990, bringing the State's population to just over the one million mark. 1 New Hampshire's communities cannot shut out this growth, but must plan for it. This handbook will be helpful to planning boards, community leaders, and citizens in their understanding of New Hampshire's planning and zoning legislation; legislation which provides New Hampshire communities with the necessary tools for planning for orderly growth in the face of mounting pressures created by additional population growth.

The Introduction gives a historical overview of planning in the United States. Chapter One provides planning board members with some understandable non-technical answers for those often asked questions: What is Community Planning? How Does Community Planning Affect People? Why Should Our Community Be Involved In Community Planning? What Is The Community Planning Process? Chapter Two discusses how communities may establish a planning board. Chapter Three focuses on the planning board's principal statutory mandate - the formulation and implementation of a Master Plan. Chapter Four reviews the planning boards powers and duties and responsibilities as set forth in New Hampshire's Zoning legislation. Chapter Five addresses the planning board's subdivision and site plan review powers. Chapter Six summarizes other New Hampshire State laws which may be relevant to planning boards.

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