Date of Award

1991

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Community Planning (MCP)

Department

Community Planning and Area Development

First Advisor

Farhad Atash

Abstract

Over the past several years there has been a growing awareness of water pollution problems in Greenwich Bay, a subembayment of Narragansett Bay which contains valuable shellfish beds. Studies have shown that water quality problems in the bay are due largely to nonpoint source pollution, which is conveyed by stormwater runoff. Nonpoint source pollution can be treated with a variety of source-control and structural techniques to manage stormwater, known as best management practices, or BMP's. Establishing storm water BMP' s to address water quality is often complicated by the fact that stormwater management has historically been a low priority for most communities, and by the high cost of some BMP' s.

This study analyzes the existing stormwater management policies and activities in Warwick, identifies changes that may be made to address water quality issues in the Greenwich Bay watershed, and assesses potential organizational and financial needs that would result from those changes. The analysis was conducted using a rational approach to program analysis, outlined by Morgan (1984). Major stormwater quality problems are defined, along with a statement of goals and objectives for improving water quality. Current stormwater management activities are identified. Possible changes in the stormwater management program and their expected levels of effectiveness are described. An assessment is made of impacts that changes may have on the existing program, and suggestions are made for prioritizing activities. The study concludes with a review of potential funding sources for BMP' s and organizational structures that have been used for stormwater management programs.

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