Date of Award

2014

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Lisa L. Weyandt

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common disorders of childhood, affecting approximately 1-2 students in every classroom across the United States. Teachers play a vital role in the assessment of student behavior and their academic performance; therefore, they need to possess an adequate level of knowledge and understanding of the various disorders that may occur during childhood and adolescence, including ADHD. Reliable and valid measurement instruments are essential for an accurate assessment of teacher knowledge of ADHD. A dearth of studies, however, has addressed the psychometric properties of questionnaires assessing teacher knowledge. The current study investigated the internal consistency, dimensionality, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of one of these measures, the ADHD Beliefs Scale-Revised, in a sample of in-service teachers (N = 226). A principal components analysis revealed two components, Beliefs about the Neurobiology of ADHD, and Beliefs about the Role of Parents in ADHD, with poor and acceptable internal consistency, respectively. Additionally, the test-retest reliability of the ADHD Beliefs Scale-Revised was found to be acceptable, and preliminary evidence of construct validity was found, despite limitations of the study. Implications for educators are discussed and suggestions for future studies are advanced.

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