Date of Award

2013

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Department

Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences

First Advisor

Cynthia Willey

Abstract

HPV vaccination is routinely recommended for young adult women aged 18-26 regardless of previous sexual activity or history of HPV-related disease. As of 2010, only 21% of US women had received ≥1 doses of HPV vaccine. The objective of this study was to describe United States (US) women aged 18-26 who do not initiate vaccination and identify a minimum subset of variables to develop a predictive model of non-vaccination. Data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey Adult Cancer Supplement were used to examine US women aged 18-26 (N=1,866). Descriptive statistics, univariate procedures, and multivariate logistic regression were conducted. Results indicate that 78% of eligible women did not receive vaccination, and 35% of unvaccinated women were not aware of the vaccine. Eight variables were retained for the final model (age aOR=2.93, 95% CI=2.00, 4.30; marital status aOR=1.75, 95% CI=1.02, 3.01; live birth in the past 5 years aOR=2.77, 95% CI=1.75, 4.39, current birth control use aOR=0.45, 95% CI=0.31, 0.64; region aOR=0.50, 95% CI=0.31, 0.79; recent doctor’s visit aOR=0.45, 95% CI=0.39-0.84; flu shot receipt aOR=0.36, 95% CI=0.24, 0.54; tetanus shot receipt aOR=0.40, 95% CI=0.26, 0.62). This model showed good fit to the data (Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square=14.41(8); p=0.07; max rescaled R-square=0.27; c statistic=0.80). These findings show that older age, being married, having children, living in the South, and not receiving other preventive health services are associated with non-vaccination. These findings identify a subgroup of at-risk women who might benefit from targeted vaccine promotion campaigns to increase HPV vaccine uptake.

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