Document Type

Article

Date of Original Version

11-28-2014

DOI

10.1002/2014GC005473

Abstract

Mangaia hosts the most radiogenic Pb-isotopic compositions observed in ocean island basalts and represents the HIMU (high µ = 238U/204Pb) mantle end-member, thought to result from recycled oceanic crust. Complete geochemical characterization of the HIMU mantle end-member has been inhibited due to a lack of deep submarine glass samples from HIMU localities. We homogenized olivine-hosted melt inclusions separated from Mangaia lavas and the resulting glassy inclusions made possible the first volatile abundances to be obtained from the HIMU mantle end-member. We also report major and trace element abundances and Pb-isotopic ratios on the inclusions, which have HIMU isotopic fingerprints. We evaluate the samples for processes that could modify the volatile and trace element abundances postmantle melting, including diffusive Fe and H2O loss, degassing, and assimilation. H2O/Ce ratios vary from 119 to 245 in the most pristine Mangaia inclusions; excluding an inclusion that shows evidence for assimilation, the primary magmatic H2O/Ce ratios vary up to ∼200, and are consistent with significant dehydration of oceanic crust during subduction and long-term storage in the mantle. CO2 concentrations range up to 2346 ppm CO2 in the inclusions. Relatively high CO2 in the inclusions, combined with previous observations of carbonate blebs in other Mangaia melt inclusions, highlight the importance of CO2 for the generation of the HIMU mantle. F/Nd ratios in the inclusions (30 ± 9; 2σ standard deviation) are higher than the canonical ratio observed in oceanic lavas, and Cl/K ratios (0.079 ± 0.028) fall in the range of pristine mantle (0.02–0.08).

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