Event Title

Introduction to T'ai Chi: Solo Form, Push Hands, and Martial Arts Application

Location

Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (Rm. 101)

Start Date

2-10-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

2-10-2014 4:45 PM

Description

Dr. Clifford Katz, Assistant Provost, Finance and Personnel. T’ai Chi (Ch’uan) can be directly translated as “grand ultimate energy that manifests when balance and harmony are achieved.” The concept of t’ai chi is described in the ancient Chinese philosophical text, the I Ching (Book of Changes). In Chinese legend, a monk originated the practice after watching a snake defeat a crane by diverting the adversary’s momentum. In Chinese philosophy, t’ai chi derives from the eternal cycle of birth and fusion of two opposite but complementary forces in the universe – the yin (feminine) and the yang (masculine). Practitioners of t’ai chi use movement to direct the yin and yang forces so as to connect to chi, or life energy. Popular in the West since the 1980’s, the practice employs flowing, rhythmic, deliberate, often circular movements, with control of the breath, and ritualized stances and positions. In China, T’ai chi is believed to integrate body, mind, and spirit; reduce stress; promote longevity; and enhance balance and flexibility. This workshop presents an orientation to the practice of this ancient Chinese discipline, teaching participants to move and breathe with awareness.

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Oct 2nd, 3:30 PM Oct 2nd, 4:45 PM

Introduction to T'ai Chi: Solo Form, Push Hands, and Martial Arts Application

Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (Rm. 101)

Dr. Clifford Katz, Assistant Provost, Finance and Personnel. T’ai Chi (Ch’uan) can be directly translated as “grand ultimate energy that manifests when balance and harmony are achieved.” The concept of t’ai chi is described in the ancient Chinese philosophical text, the I Ching (Book of Changes). In Chinese legend, a monk originated the practice after watching a snake defeat a crane by diverting the adversary’s momentum. In Chinese philosophy, t’ai chi derives from the eternal cycle of birth and fusion of two opposite but complementary forces in the universe – the yin (feminine) and the yang (masculine). Practitioners of t’ai chi use movement to direct the yin and yang forces so as to connect to chi, or life energy. Popular in the West since the 1980’s, the practice employs flowing, rhythmic, deliberate, often circular movements, with control of the breath, and ritualized stances and positions. In China, T’ai chi is believed to integrate body, mind, and spirit; reduce stress; promote longevity; and enhance balance and flexibility. This workshop presents an orientation to the practice of this ancient Chinese discipline, teaching participants to move and breathe with awareness.