Event Title

Sexual Violence in Young People’s Lives

Location

Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (Rm. 101)

Start Date

2-10-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

2-10-2014 3:15 PM

Description

Dr. Donna Hughes, Professor, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Jennifer Longa, Director, Civility Education. After designating sexual violence on campus as a serious public health issue, the American College Health Association (ACHA) in its Campus Violence White Paper presented research that revealed high rates of sexual violence on college and university campuses and low levels of reporting of these incidents by students. An estimated one in every four women on campus will experience gender violence. “Coupled with cultural acceptance of rape myths, high levels of victimization create an environment where…students are disempowered and alienated from their college experiences.” The consequences of sexual violence is often lower chances for academic success and persistence to graduation, and higher incidence of mental and physical health issues. Students cannot learn in an environment where they do not feel safe. In 2014, public awareness about sexual violence on campus has been heightened by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. This workshop advocates that faculty, staff, administrators, and students must play key roles in the creation of a campus culture that actively works to prevent sexual violence, addressing the domains of influence of potential victims, perpetrators, and bystanders.

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Oct 2nd, 2:00 PM Oct 2nd, 3:15 PM

Sexual Violence in Young People’s Lives

Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (Rm. 101)

Dr. Donna Hughes, Professor, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Jennifer Longa, Director, Civility Education. After designating sexual violence on campus as a serious public health issue, the American College Health Association (ACHA) in its Campus Violence White Paper presented research that revealed high rates of sexual violence on college and university campuses and low levels of reporting of these incidents by students. An estimated one in every four women on campus will experience gender violence. “Coupled with cultural acceptance of rape myths, high levels of victimization create an environment where…students are disempowered and alienated from their college experiences.” The consequences of sexual violence is often lower chances for academic success and persistence to graduation, and higher incidence of mental and physical health issues. Students cannot learn in an environment where they do not feel safe. In 2014, public awareness about sexual violence on campus has been heightened by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. This workshop advocates that faculty, staff, administrators, and students must play key roles in the creation of a campus culture that actively works to prevent sexual violence, addressing the domains of influence of potential victims, perpetrators, and bystanders.