Event Title

Mental Health Advocacy and Awareness

Location

Multicultural Center, Computer Classroom (Rm. 005)

Start Date

30-9-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

30-9-2014 4:45 PM

Description

Paige Ramsdell, Coordinator, and Jacqui Tisdale, Coordinator, Disability Services for Students. More than 16 million young people attend colleges and universities in the United States. Of these young people, approximately 4 million students have enrolled for the first time. The transition from home to college can heighten the pressures of being on one’s own, “fittng in” to a new community, adjusting to new study standards, balancing study, work, and social and cultural life, and moving from late adolescence to emerging adulthood. According to an annual survey by the American College Health Association, 30.6% of college students reported that they felt so depressed at some point during the academic year that it was difficult to function. Depression, anxiety disorders, panic attacks, ADHD, and eating disorders are among the primary conditions experienced. The recent increase in severity and quantity of students needing diagnosis and treatment of mental illness has caused colleges and universities to scramble for additional resources. An estimated 64% of students who drop out do so because of mental illness. This workshop provides a framework for understanding mental illness and suggests ways in which campuses as well as the campus community can act to reinforce mental wellness.

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Sep 30th, 3:30 PM Sep 30th, 4:45 PM

Mental Health Advocacy and Awareness

Multicultural Center, Computer Classroom (Rm. 005)

Paige Ramsdell, Coordinator, and Jacqui Tisdale, Coordinator, Disability Services for Students. More than 16 million young people attend colleges and universities in the United States. Of these young people, approximately 4 million students have enrolled for the first time. The transition from home to college can heighten the pressures of being on one’s own, “fittng in” to a new community, adjusting to new study standards, balancing study, work, and social and cultural life, and moving from late adolescence to emerging adulthood. According to an annual survey by the American College Health Association, 30.6% of college students reported that they felt so depressed at some point during the academic year that it was difficult to function. Depression, anxiety disorders, panic attacks, ADHD, and eating disorders are among the primary conditions experienced. The recent increase in severity and quantity of students needing diagnosis and treatment of mental illness has caused colleges and universities to scramble for additional resources. An estimated 64% of students who drop out do so because of mental illness. This workshop provides a framework for understanding mental illness and suggests ways in which campuses as well as the campus community can act to reinforce mental wellness.