Evaluating the efficacy of the Rhode Island Teen Dating Violence Prevention Program (TDVPP): A process and outcome approach to determining the success of both primary and secondary prevention projects

Amy Beth Silverman, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

Research on teen dating violence (TDV) to date has relied almost exclusively on high school samples and little is known about the prevalence TDV in middle schools. Although a large number of teen dating violence prevention programs have been implemented in high schools and middle school throughout the country in recent years, few have been rigorously evaluated, and quantitative evidence of program efficacy is rare (National Research Council, 1998). This dissertation describes program evaluation results from the Rhode Island Teen Dating Violence Prevention Program, a multi-faceted intervention consisting of (1) a primary prevention project delivered to sixth and seventh grade middle school students in 10 intervention schools (n = 2,717), and (2) a secondary prevention project delivered to a subset of students determined to be at high-risk for the victimization and perpetration of TDV (n = 293). Quasi-experimental and experimental research designs and analysis of variance statistical techniques assessed both the short and long-term effects of the interventions on student's knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intent regarding TDV. Self-report student questionnaires were collected at multiple time-points. Process and outcome evaluation data were integrated together to determine each intervention's overall efficacy. Results indicate that both interventions were effective in changing student knowledge and attitudes regarding TDV, but not behavioral intent regarding what to do in abusive situations. In addition, data were collected on the prevalence rates of dating and minor TDV behaviors (victimization and perpetration). Findings indicate that 58% of the primary prevention sample and 82% of the secondary prevention sample reported dating and/or going steady behaviors. Approximately 15% of the students in the general population and 16% of the high-risk sample reported victimization and/or perpetration of minor TDV. In both studies, perpetration rates differed by sex. Girls were significantly more likely to perpetrate TDV than boys, while boys were significantly more likely to be victims of TDV than girls. This study is the first integrated program evaluation of its kind to examine TDV in a middle school sample. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Social|Education, Secondary|Psychology, Clinical|Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Recommended Citation

Amy Beth Silverman, "Evaluating the efficacy of the Rhode Island Teen Dating Violence Prevention Program (TDVPP): A process and outcome approach to determining the success of both primary and secondary prevention projects" (2000). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI9989453.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI9989453

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