The employer /employee relationship: Identifying type and level of employee involvement and the relationship to extra -role behavior and intent to remain

John Thomas O'Connell, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

This study proposes that employees have a dominant source of motivation, that is, a source of motivation that has the greatest impact on their work behavior. Employers who retain both employees and contract workers is used as a context in which to test certain aspects of this theory. Specifically, this research asks whether employees and contractors differ in their dominant sources of motivation. Also, it is asked whether satisfaction with aspects of work associated with an individual's dominant source of motivation represent the best predictor of work related behaviors such as membership and extra role performance. ^ This study was carried out by focusing on information technology professionals, employees and contractors at several organizations. These organizations represent a mix of large and small firms in the manufacturing, insurance, banking and government industries. Potential respondents were given a questionnaire to fill out and return by mail. A total of 143 responses were received comprising 51 permanent employees, 48 hourly contractors, and 44 salary contractors. ^ The results found that employees and contractors do have a measurable difference in their dominant source of motivation. Additionally, satisfaction with an individual's dominant source of motivation was found to be the best predictor of intent to remain and extra role performance. These results are discussed as are the theoretical and practical implications of this study. ^

Subject Area

Business Administration, Management|Psychology, Industrial

Recommended Citation

John Thomas O'Connell, "The employer /employee relationship: Identifying type and level of employee involvement and the relationship to extra -role behavior and intent to remain" (1999). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI9945219.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI9945219

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