Childhood sexual abuse and family functioning linked with eating and substance misuse: Mediated structural models

Kimberly Jeanne Mitchell, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

The current study integrated three major theories: Problem Behavior Theory, Social Cognitive Theory, and the Theory of Cognitive Adaptation; and several constructs into a single, testable framework. The effects child sexual abuse and family functioning on eating, alcohol, and drug misuse mediated through life satisfaction, coping, and self-efficacy were examined with a sample of 469 undergraduate students. A combination of structural equation modeling techniques and multivariate analysis of variance revealed the following conclusions: (1) the health-risk behaviors of alcohol use, drug use, and disordered eating may be part of a single behavioral syndrome; (2) there is a complex relationship between child sexual abuse and family functioning suggesting that childhood sexual abuse indirectly effects other constructs through family functioning, but not directly; (3) family functioning and cognitive mediators interact in specific and consistent ways to determine health-risk behavior; (4) high self-efficacy for alcohol use, drug use, and disordered eating relates to lower levels of their respective health-risk behaviors; (5) earlier age of onset of alcohol and drug use along with having a greater number of family/friends who use these substances are related to lower self-efficacy for alcohol and drug use along with more actual use; (6) a relationship was revealed between everyday stress, life satisfaction, coping, and eating self-efficacy but not the alcohol and drug use constructs; and (7) gender differences and sexual abuse differences were found for several constructs, but the magnitude of these effects was low. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies|Psychology, Psychometrics

Recommended Citation

Kimberly Jeanne Mitchell, "Childhood sexual abuse and family functioning linked with eating and substance misuse: Mediated structural models" (1998). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI9920543.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI9920543

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