Use of an auditory continuous performance task in the assessment of QEEG measures in asymptomatic HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women

Laura Costa, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

Quantitative EEG was obtained for 11 asymptomatic HIV sero-positive women and 11 HIV sero-negative controls during a resting condition and during three continuous performance tasks (CPTs) that differed in their demands on language and/or semantic processing. The study was exploratory in nature, in that it is the first study, to the authors' knowledge, to examine EEG in asymptomatic HIV positive and negative women solely. The investigation was designed to address this and other limitations of previous research regarding selection of participants and the type of task conditions under which EEG is measured. A second purpose was to determine whether EEG measures could discriminate between cognitive tasks that require various levels and types of cognitive activation. Participants' EEG was recorded during performance of three language tasks: a simple phonetic task consisting of letters of the English alphabet, a simple semantic task consisting of monosyllabic words from four common semantic categories, and a complex semantic task consisting of the same word stimuli but requiring a more complex semantic judgement. Regarding the first purpose of the study, no significant differences were found between the asymptomatic HIV positive group and the control group. Regarding the second purpose of the study, it was possible to discriminate between the simple and complex semantic tasks with several EEG measures including beta2 power, delta power and a PCA-derived component comprised of beta1 and beta2 from the left hemisphere. Possible implications and directions for future research are discussed. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Experimental|Psychology, Physiological

Recommended Citation

Laura Costa, "Use of an auditory continuous performance task in the assessment of QEEG measures in asymptomatic HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women" (1996). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI9707174.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI9707174

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