An exploratory study of a women's health nurse practitioner - client interaction as resource exchange in a clinic environment

Rebecca Koeniger Donohue, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

Nurse practitioner interactions with mid-life women in the primary care ambulatory setting were investigated to determine the empirical basis for the resource exchange theory. An exploratory descriptive design was used. The data for the study were comprised of audiotaped pre- and post-encounter interviews with the participants, audiotapes of the entire clinic visits of the participating dyads, and the field notes recorded by the researcher of the client visits following the guidelines proposed by Schatzman and Strauss. Audiotapes were transcribed verbatim and the ETHNOGRAPH was used to identify references to resources by the participants. The participants included two women's heath care nurse practitioners and eight midlife female clients in separate private practices in different New England states.^ Research results indicate that the predominant resources which emerged in the context of the health care visits were goods such as medication, and services such as examination and referral, reinforcement of positive health behaviors, support, affirmation, trust, and self-disclosure. Further, the qualities of the nurse became an important part of the exchange across all encounters. The data from the eight encounters suggest that the client-NP exchanges vary in their specific emphasis on the types of resources from strictly instrumentally-oriented to empowering exchanges, and from congruent expectation-exchanges either of instrumental or personal orientations to negotiated exchanges in which incongruent expectations between the participants are handled to arrive at mutually acceptable exchanges. ^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Nursing

Recommended Citation

Rebecca Koeniger Donohue, "An exploratory study of a women's health nurse practitioner - client interaction as resource exchange in a clinic environment" (1995). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI9601842.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI9601842

Share

COinS