A hand-held microfluidic fluorescence lab-on-chip biological detection system

John D Jones, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

This experimental study investigates the feasibility of using a lens-less charge-coupled device (CCD) for the detection of organic and inorganic fluorophores. The study further investigates the feasibility of this device as a detection sensor in a hand-held Point-of-Care (POC) microfluidic Lab-on-Chip (LOC) detector. ^ The use of microfluidic LOC technology now allows the miniaturization of standard laboratory equipment and helped reduce the time necessary to achieve an accurate result. However, current Point-of-Care (POC) devices are still relatively large and are not easily transportable. For these reasons, the design of a space saving imager has become the target of this study. ^ In the study, several CCD cameras similar to a webcam with the lens removed were tested for the detection of organic and inorganic fluorophores. Of these, a Fire I CCD lens-less imager, having the ability to return a true representation of the detection site, was successfully used for the detection of three common fluorophores (fluorescein, phosphor dots, and quantum dots). Thus it was shown that the lens-less CCD imager is accurate enough to detect quantum dots in alcohol with a Limit of Detection (LOD) at 0.028 &eegr;M, and quantum dots in buffer solution at 6.38 µM. It was also proven that phosphor dots could be detected to a concentration of 23.10 µM. The Fire I lens-less CCD was able to detect C-reactive protein (CRP) with a LOD of 5.65 µM which is just above the "normal" clinical range 3–5 µM. ^ Having proven that the lens-less CCD can detect fluorophores so near to clinical values for C - reactive protein (CRP), a proof of concept Hand Held Biological Lens-less Detector (HBLD) was designed and built to show how it could be used in a Point-of-Care/Lab-on-Chip (POC/ LOC) application. ^ A custom iPhone application was created to connect to a central data base in order to provide up-to-date and accurate results and to control and monitor the progress of the C-reactive protein/Lab-on-Chip test being performed. The Hand-held Biological Lens-less Detector (HBLD) was also connected to a central server, which upon completion of a C-reactive protein (CRP) test, interpreted the test results, generated a custom, patient-specific report in PDF form, and set either a text message or an e-mail. A custom server program also sent the results to a smartphone so that the results could be reviewed. ^ Through this experimental study it was found that indeed a lens-less charge-couple device (CCD) can be used for the detection of organic and inorganic fluorophores. Furthermore, this device can be miniaturized into an effective, hand-held Point-of-Care (POC) microfluidic Lab-on-Chip (LOC) detector. ^ To be an effective POC device, a detector needs to be connected in some way to a central database to provide up to date and accurate results. To display the results a custom iPhone application (App) was created to control and monitor the progress of CRP LOC test that is being performed. The HBLD is wirelessly connected via a router to a smartphone, such as an iPhone. The HBLD is also connected to a central server that upon completion of a CRP test interprets the test results and generates a custom patient specific report in PDF form and sends either a text message or an email. A custom server program also sends the results to the iPhone so that the results can be reviewed.^

Subject Area

Engineering, Mechanical

Recommended Citation

John D Jones, "A hand-held microfluidic fluorescence lab-on-chip biological detection system" (2012). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI3522640.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI3522640

Share

COinS