Student, peer, and teacher reports of bullying: Examining the correlations between multiple informants and accuracy by type of informant

Robyn Beth Bratica Sullivan, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

The present study examined gender differences in relational victimization as reported by various informants in public school settings. This study also examined the accuracy of various informants in detecting relational victimization. Students and teachers in grades five and six completed three versions of the Social Experience Questionnaire and provided ratings about overt victimization, relational victimization, and pro-social acts. It was hypothesized that teachers and peers of students would rate girls as experiencing relational victimization more often than boys. This hypothesis was partially supported as peers rated other female students as experiencing relational victimization more often than boys, though this same conclusion could not be made for the ratings of teachers. The second hypothesis of this study, that peers would be the most accurate informants in identifying relational victimization when it occurs, was not supported, as student self reports emerged as the most significant predictor of daily reports of relational victimization. Limitations of this study and future directions for research are also discussed.^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology|Psychology, Developmental

Recommended Citation

Robyn Beth Bratica Sullivan, "Student, peer, and teacher reports of bullying: Examining the correlations between multiple informants and accuracy by type of informant" (2012). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI3503133.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI3503133

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