ADHD symptomology and associated variables in a sample of college students

Grace M Janusis, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

Objective. The present study investigated the association between ADHD symptomology and sleep, depression, alcohol use, and marijuana use. The study also explored whether students attribute their ADHD symptomology to ADHD, sleep, depression, alcohol use, or marijuana use. Method. College students responded to the PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (PEDS), Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS), Internal Restlessness Scale (IRS), Current Symptoms Scale (CSS), College Student ADHD Symptom Scale (CSASS), and questions related to their alcohol and marijuana use during the past month. Results: It was hypothesized that college students who reported lower ratings on the PEDS, higher ratings on the DASS Depression subscale, and higher ratings of alcohol use and marijuana use during the last 30 days would also report higher ratings on the CSS, IRS, and CSASS. The hypotheses were partially supported as multiple regression results revealed that scores on the PEDS and DASS depression subscale significantly contributed to predicting 54.5% of the variance of the IRS. Results. also revealed that the PEDS, DASS depression subscale, alcohol use, and marijuana use significantly contributed 52.3% of the variance of the CSS. In addition, the PEDS, alcohol use, and marijuana use significantly contributed to 50.9% of the variance of the CSASS. Lastly, college students’ attributions of ADHD symptomology to ADHD, depression, sleep, alcohol use, and marijuana use are discussed. Conclusion. The findings suggest that difficulties with sleep, depression, alcohol use, and marijuana use are significantly associated with ADHD symptomology. Limitations of the current study and future directions are discussed. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Grace M Janusis, "ADHD symptomology and associated variables in a sample of college students" (2011). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI3459858.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI3459858

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