Decisional balance for condom use and temptations for unprotected sex among gay and bisexual men

H. Elsa Larson, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

Condom use is the most effective prevention behavior against the sexual transmission of HIV, yet some gay and bisexual men do not always use condoms in HIV risk contexts. New interventions to increase condom use in this population should be informed by strong theoretical frameworks. This study assessed the applicability of Transtheoretical Model measures for condom use in a sample of gay and bisexual men. The primary aim of this study was to examine if the functional relationships between stage of change and other TTM constructs of decisional balance for condom use and temptations for unprotected sex would be replicated in this sample. A secondary aim was to examine the strength of the relationships between TTM constructs and sexual risk behavior. A convenience sample (N=133) of gay and bisexual men was recruited between January 2011 and February 2012 to complete an Internet-based questionnaire. Results indicate that 38% of men were in Precontemplation, 19% were in Contemplation, 14% were in Preparation, and 29% were in Action/Maintenance for consistent condom use. Pros, cons, and temptations varied significantly by stage of change and the expected theoretical patterns between constructs were replicated. Additionally, pros, cons, temptations, and stage were all significant predictors of sexual risk behavior and accounted for 43% of the observed variance in sexual risk behavior. This study adds to previous research applying TTM constructs to condom use for gay and bisexual male samples. These and other findings suggest the TTM may be a useful model to describe and predict condom use among gay and bisexual men.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Behavioral

Recommended Citation

H. Elsa Larson, "Decisional balance for condom use and temptations for unprotected sex among gay and bisexual men" (2012). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI1516160.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI1516160

Share

COinS