Development of a lab-on-a-chip fluorescent imaging system and its applications to the detection of Alzheimer's Disease biomarkers

Kelly Ann Cook, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

This experimental study investigates the feasibility of the realization a Lab-on-a-Chip biosensor for fluorescent detection of beta-amyloid, the protein currently perceived as the major biomarker of Alzheimer's Disease. The principal goal was to determine the ability of a lens-free detector featuring a Charged Coupled Device to function as a quantitative monitor of the concentration of such proteins. In order to complete this multifaceted task, three individual experimental stages were required based on standard bioassay procedures, microfluidics and image processing, respectively. Standard bioassays procedures were initially researched to characterize the fluorescent behavior of beta-amyloid. The microfluidic system used was especially designed for the easy-integration of optical fibers by researchers at the Institute for Microtechnology (TU Braunschweig, Germany). The system was fabricated out of PDMS and bonded to a thin glass base. A housing which aligned the microfluidic system with the necessary optical components was produced via rapid prototyping technology. An inexpensive and reliable fluorophore was used to initially test and develop the imaging system. The signal of 4,4-dianilino-1,1'-binapthyl-5,5'-disulfonic acid (bis-ANS), the fluorescent dye that is best-suited for the detection of the Alzheimer's Disease biomarker, was then evaluated with the optimized imaging system. The arrangement was proven capable of distinguishing between different concentrations of fluorescent dye between 5 µM and 500 µM through the comparison of intensity curves to those from control experiments based on spectroscopy. ^

Subject Area

Biology, Microbiology|Engineering, Biomedical|Engineering, Mechanical

Recommended Citation

Kelly Ann Cook, "Development of a lab-on-a-chip fluorescent imaging system and its applications to the detection of Alzheimer's Disease biomarkers" (2011). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI1503328.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI1503328

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