Anthelmintic Efficacy of Bioactive Compounds Within Cranberry Vine and Birdsfoot Trefoil

Carly Barone, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

With the growth of resistance to commercial dewormers in small ruminant gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN), alternative methods are needed for GIN control. It has been shown that plants containing certain secondary compounds (SC) suppress GIN infection, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning the mechanism behind this anthelmintic activity, as well as a lack of viable alternatives to commercial dewormers in the northeastern United States. Secondary compounds, such as proanthocyanidin (PAC), have complex chemical structures that vary between plant species, while SC concentrations can vary between different varieties of the same species. The relationship between specific SC and anti-parasitic efficacy is unknown. This study explores the use of PAC-rich cranberry vine (CV) and birdsfoot trefoil (BFT) as an alternative to commercial dewormers in the control of GIN in small ruminants. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.)^

Subject Area

Agriculture|Sustainability

Recommended Citation

Carly Barone, "Anthelmintic Efficacy of Bioactive Compounds Within Cranberry Vine and Birdsfoot Trefoil" (2017). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI10258878.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI10258878

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