Improved modeling of image-guided thermal ablation procedures towards patientspecific treatment planning applications

Garron Deshazer, University of Rhode Island

Abstract

Microwave ablation (MWA) is a minimally-invasive modality that is playing an increasingly vital role in the treatment of cancer and benign disease. These procedures involve the use of a microwave antenna (or an array of antennas) to deliver energy to raise tissue temperature above a thermal threshold to induce irreversible cell damage. Commonly used clinical MWA systems operate at frequencies of 2450 MHz and 915 MHz . Image-guided percutaneous MWA treatments can be guided by intraoperative ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy, which allows the physician to deliver treatments precisely. As such, image-guided MWA has received substantial attention for the treatment of cancer in the past decade that is performed in combination with other therapies (radiation therapy) or used as an alternative to other more invasive procedures (surgical resection). There has been increasing interest in improving the efficacy and specificity of MWA through improving energy delivery and application techniques in this domain. This review outlines clinical percutaneous MWA technology detailing concepts related to thermal dosimetry, the physics of microwave heating, modeling of MWA in tissue, and future goals of treatment planning in the context of image-guided MWA procedures. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.) ^

Subject Area

Medicine|Nuclear physics and radiation|Oncology

Recommended Citation

Garron Deshazer, "Improved modeling of image-guided thermal ablation procedures towards patientspecific treatment planning applications" (2016). Dissertations and Master's Theses (Campus Access). Paper AAI10113631.
http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/dissertations/AAI10113631

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