Poster Title

Assessing the Tailgating Situation on Urban Rhode Island Highways and Potential Counter-Tailgating Measures

Location

Robert L. Carothers Library and Learning Commons

Start Date

13-4-2011 10:00 AM

End Date

13-4-2011 3:00 PM

Abstract

Tailgating is an aggressive driving behavior and a leading cause of rear-end crashes. Understanding tailgating and finding means to mitigate tailgating behavior on highways has become a priority to many urban traffic management authorities. A human factors study was conducted to investigate the tailgating issue and possible counter-tailgating measures. The study started with a questionnaire survey and a traffic analysis to assess the causes and effects of tailgating and its impact on urban RI highway traffic. To identify drivers’ perceptions on tailgating behavior, 210 subjects were recruited in the survey. It found that 95% of participants are potential tailgators and heavy traffic was identified as the top tailgating cause. Vehicle headways on specific urban segments of three major RI highways were next examined in the traffic analysis. It found that over 60% of vehicles were tailgating during rush hours and about 40% during non-rush hours. The findings confirmed that serious tailgating exists on urban RI highways. To advise drivers and mitigate their tailgating behaviors, counter-tailgating measures such as advisory signs and an educational video were designed and assessed through a driving simulation experiment. Pronounced effect of advisory signs on limiting tailgating was identified especially after subjects viewing the video. Participants’ driving behaviors were further studied through a field study. The majority found it difficult to maintain a safe following distance in a real driving environment without employing any measures. Based on the results, it is recommended that the proposed counter-tailgating measures be adopted into a more sophisticated tailgating treatment system.

Comments

This poster has been awarded a Third Place honor.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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Apr 13th, 10:00 AM Apr 13th, 3:00 PM

Assessing the Tailgating Situation on Urban Rhode Island Highways and Potential Counter-Tailgating Measures

Robert L. Carothers Library and Learning Commons

Tailgating is an aggressive driving behavior and a leading cause of rear-end crashes. Understanding tailgating and finding means to mitigate tailgating behavior on highways has become a priority to many urban traffic management authorities. A human factors study was conducted to investigate the tailgating issue and possible counter-tailgating measures. The study started with a questionnaire survey and a traffic analysis to assess the causes and effects of tailgating and its impact on urban RI highway traffic. To identify drivers’ perceptions on tailgating behavior, 210 subjects were recruited in the survey. It found that 95% of participants are potential tailgators and heavy traffic was identified as the top tailgating cause. Vehicle headways on specific urban segments of three major RI highways were next examined in the traffic analysis. It found that over 60% of vehicles were tailgating during rush hours and about 40% during non-rush hours. The findings confirmed that serious tailgating exists on urban RI highways. To advise drivers and mitigate their tailgating behaviors, counter-tailgating measures such as advisory signs and an educational video were designed and assessed through a driving simulation experiment. Pronounced effect of advisory signs on limiting tailgating was identified especially after subjects viewing the video. Participants’ driving behaviors were further studied through a field study. The majority found it difficult to maintain a safe following distance in a real driving environment without employing any measures. Based on the results, it is recommended that the proposed counter-tailgating measures be adopted into a more sophisticated tailgating treatment system.