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Abstract

Whilst an emerging body of research documents the adverse physical and mental health outcomes of victims of trafficking following rescue, there is little research or guidance regarding interventions which improve these outcomes. In this article, I describe my experience as physician involved in a computer-based social enterprise for survivors of trafficking and slavery in the Philippines, and outline my evolving understanding of the requirements for health behavior change and improved outcomes. I conclude that while meaningful vocational skills, economic security, and adequate health-related knowledge are foundational, it is necessary to develop core skills to achieve improved health outcomes and that a supportive workplace is an ideal setting for this to occur.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.